Prevention of Climate Change

Prevention of Climate Change

Climate change includes both global warming driven by human-induced emissions of greenhouse gases and the resulting large-scale shifts in weather patterns. The environmental effects of climate change are broad and far-reaching, affecting oceans, ice, and weather. Changes may occur gradually or rapidly.Extremely wet or dry events within the monsoon period have increased in India and East Asia. The maximum rainfall and wind speed from hurricanes and typhoons is likely increasing. Frequency of tropical cyclones has not increased as a result of climate change. While tornado and severe thunderstorm frequency has not increased as a result of climate change, the areas affected by such phenomena may be changing.
Global sea level is rising as a consequence of glacial melt, melt of the ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica, and thermal expansion. Climate change has led to decades of shrinking and thinning of the Arctic sea ice, making it vulnerable to atmospheric anomalies. While ice-free summers are expected to be rare at 1.5 °C (2.7 °F) degrees of warming, they are set to occur once every three to ten years at a warming level of 2.0 °C (3.6 °F). Higher atmospheric CO 2 concentrations have led to changes in ocean chemistry. An increase in dissolved CO 2 is causing oceans to acidify. In addition, oxygen levels are decreasing as oxygen is less soluble in warmer water, with hypoxic dead zones expanding as a result of algal blooms stimulated by higher temperatures, higher CO2 levels, ocean deoxygenation, and eutrophication. The greater the amount of global warming, the greater the risk of passing through ‘tipping points’, thresholds beyond which certain impacts can no longer be avoided even if temperatures are reduced.The long-term effects of climate change include further ice melt, ocean warming, sea level rise, and ocean acidification. Recent warming has driven many terrestrial and freshwater species poleward and towards higher altitudes. Higher atmospheric CO2 levels and an extended growing season have resulted in global greening, whereas heatwaves and drought have reduced ecosystem productivity in some regions. The future balance of these opposing effects is unclear. Climate change has contributed to the expansion of drier climate zones, such as the expansion of deserts in the subtropics. The size and speed of global warming is making abrupt changes in ecosystems more likely. Overall, it is expected that climate change will result in the extinction of many species. The oceans have heated more slowly than the land, but plants and animals in the ocean have migrated towards the colder poles faster than species on land.Ocean acidification is impacting organisms who produce shells and skeletons, such as mussels and barnacles, and coral reefs; coral reefs have seen extensive bleaching after heat waves. Continued emission of greenhouse gases will lead to further warming and long-lasting changes in the climate system, with potentially “severe, pervasive and irreversible impacts” for both people and ecosystems. Climate change risks are unevenly distributed, but are generally greater for disadvantaged people in developing and developed countries. Health impacts include both the direct effects of extreme weather, leading to injury and loss of life, as well as indirect effects, such as undernutrition brought on by crop failures. Various infectious diseases are more easily transmitted in a warmer climate, such as dengue fever, which affects children most severely, and malaria. Young children are the most vulnerable to food shortages, and together with older people, to extreme countries. The effects of warming on the oceans impact fish stocks, with a global decline in the maximum catch
potential. Only polar stocks are showing an increased potential. Regions dependent on glacier water, regions that are already dry, and small islands are at increased risk of water stress due to climate countries.

There are ways to reduce Climate Change. What solutions to consider?
1. Renewable energies : Changing our main energy sources to clean and renewable energy. Solar, Wind, Geothermal and biomass could be the solution.
2. Sustainable transportation : Our transport methods must be aligned with environmental requirements and reduce their carbon footprint. It is essential to rethink our transport methods from the design stage towards eco-friendly transportation.
3. Air pollution prevention : Many methods exist to prevent, control and reduce air pollution, in particular by reducing the consumption of fossil fuels, and limiting industry emissions and waste.
4. Waste Management & recycling : The simplest solution to reduce waste is to adapt our production methods to our consumption patterns. The recycling process must also be taken into account in our consumption habits.
Sea and Ocean preservation : Oceans and seas are the largest storage of greenhouse gases and are an exceptional support system for life on this planet. Limiting overfishing, unsustainable development activities in coastal areas and the consumption of environmentally friendly products is now essential.
6. Circular economy : Use the 3 r's of circular economy (Reduce, Reuse and Recycle) to significantly reduce our waste and avoid unnecessary production of new items.
7. Power your home with renewable energy : Choose a utility company that generates at least half its power from wind or solar and has been certified by Green-e Energy, an organization that vets renewable energy options. If that isn’t possible for you, take a look at your electric bill; many utilities now list other ways to support renewable sources on their monthly statements and websites.
8. Reduce water waste : Saving water reduces carbon pollution, too. That's because it takes a lot of energy to pump, heat, and treat your water. So take shorter showers, turn off the tap while brushing your teeth.
9. Buy better bulbs : LED light bulbs use up to 80 percent less energy than conventional incandescent. They’re also cheaper in the long run
10. Pull the plug : Don't leave fully charged devices plugged into your home's outlets, unplug rarely used devices or plug them into power strips and timers, and adjust your computers and monitors to automatically power down to the lowest power mode when not in use.

Human-induced climate change has contributed to changing patterns of extreme weather across the globe, from longer and hotter heat waves to heavier rains. Extreme weather is on the rise, and the indications are that it will continue to increase, in both predictable and unpredictable ways.

- Dipshika Sen
Content Writer
Social Journal