Anti-Drone System

Anti-Drone System

A drone, in technology terms, is an unmanned aircraft. Drones are formally known as
unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) or unmanned aircraft systems (UASs). Essentially, a
drone is a flying robot that can be remotely controlled or fly autonomously through
software-controlled flight plans in their embedded systems, working in conjunction with
onboard sensors and GPS. In the recent past, UAVs were most often associated with
the military, where they were used initially for anti-aircraft target practice, intelligence
gathering, and then, more controversially, as weapons platforms. Drones are now also
utilized in a good range of civilian roles starting from search and rescue, surveillance,
traffic monitoring, weather monitoring, and firefighting, to non-public drones and
business drone-based photography, as well as videography, agriculture, and even
delivery services.
Many trace the history of drones to 1849 Italy, when Venice was fighting for its
independence from Austria. Austrian soldiers attacked Venice with hot-air, hydrogen, or
helium-filled balloons equipped with bombs. The first pilotless radio-controlled aircraft
were used in World War 1. In 1918, the U.S. Army developed the experimental kettering
Bug, an unmanned "flying bomb", which was never used in combat. The first generally
used drone appeared in 1935 as a full-size retooling of the de Havilland DH82B "Queen
Bee '' biplane, which was fitted with a radio and servo-operated controls in the back
seat. The plane might be conventionally piloted from the front seat, but generally, it flew
unmanned and was shot at by artillery gunners in training. The term drone dates to this
initial use, a play on the "Queen Bee '' nomenclature.UAV technology continued to be of
interest to the military, but it was often too unreliable and costly put it was often too
unreliable and costly to put into use. After concerns about the shooting down of spy
planes arose, the military revisited the subject of unmanned aerial vehicles. Military use
of drones soon expanded to play roles in dropping leaflets and acting as spying decoys.
Drones contain a large number of technological components, including Electronic
Speed Controllers (ESC), an electronic circuit that controls a motor's speed and
direction. Flight controller, GPS module, Battery, Antenna, Receiver, Cameras,
Sensors, including ultrasonic and collision avoidance sensors, Accelerometer, which
measures altitude. Features Include Camera type, video resolution, megapixels and
media storage format, Maximum flight time, such as how long the drone can remain in
the air, Maximum speeds, including ascent and descent, Hover accuracy, Obstacle
sensory range, Altitude hold, which keeps the drone at a fixed attitude, Live video feed,
Flight logs.
Drones can be equipped with several sensors, including distance sensors, time-of-flight
sensors, chemical sensors, and stabilization and orientation sensors, among others.
Visual
sensors offer still or video data, with RGB sensors collecting standard visual red, green
and blue wavelengths, like infrared and ultraviolet. Accelerometers, gyroscopes,
magnetometers, barometers, and GPS are also common drone features. For example,
thermal sensors are often integral in surveillance or security applications, like livestock
monitoring or heat-signature detection. Hyperspectral sensors can help identify minerals

and vegetables and are ideal for use in crop health, water quality and surface
composition. Some drones employ obstacle detection and collision avoidance sensors.
Initially, the sensors were designed to detect objects ahead of the drone. Some drones
now provide obstacle detection altogether in six directions: front, back, below, above,
and side to side.
Drone platforms have two main types: rotor, including single-rotor or multi-rotor (such as
tricopters, quadcopters, hexacopters, and octocopters), or fixed-wing, which include the
hybrid VTOL (vertical takeoff and landing) drones that don't require runways. Many
personal drones are now available for consumer use, offering HD video or still camera
capabilities, or simply fly around. These drones often weigh anywhere from but a pound
to 10 pounds. Drones can assist farmers by measuring and recording the peak of crops.
They use a foreign sensing technology called Lidar that illuminates the crop with a laser
and calculates the distance by measuring what's reflected. Drones with biological
sensors can fly to unsafe areas to take air quality readings and check for the presence
of specific microorganisms or atmospheric elements. During wildfires, drones can
survey the extent of the affected areas and determine how quickly the fires are
spreading. Images taken can provide details of the damage in specific areas. Drones
are used by television sports networks to capture sporting event footage, such as taped
and live flyover footage, that would otherwise be difficult to acquire. The use of drones
must suit regulations from the FAA, the sports leagues, the venue, and local law
enforcement.